New Drivers

Offence codes: PL10/PL20/PL30/PL50

New drivers can find themselves facing a revocation of their driving licences if they acquire 6 penalty points. This is as a consequence of legislation which was introduced so as to provide the DVLA with a way of  recalling drivers who had recently acquired their driving licences, and whom had demonstrated poor skills by committing motoring offences.

Newly qualified drivers have two years of probation after passing their test.

In the initial two year probationary period, a driver acquires 6 or more penalty points on his/her driving licence, then he/she will be subject to the revocation of the licence. The licence will not be returned until the driver has successfully taken the full driving test.

What is important to understand is that revocation is not a part of the punishment imposed by the Court. It is an administrative process overseen by the DVLA. It is therefore not a matter for consideration by the Magistrates Court. There is no discretion by which the court might dis-apply the revocation. What is important is that you avoid finding yourself in that situation, either by successfully entering a not guilty plea to any alleged motoring offence, or by mitigating the offence so as to reduce any penalty.

Are you a new driver and worried about losing your licence? Richard Wood manages to avoid disqualification from driving in a large proportion of cases – click here to get in touch today, and we can fight for the best possible result.

CALL US FOR FREE AND WITHOUT OBLIGATION ADVICE ON YOUR PROBLEM AS A NEW DRIVER ON 0800 012 6039 OR FILL OUT AN ENQUIRY FORM

We at Keep Your Licence often get calls from clients who have accepted fixed penalty notices for motoring offences such as driving without insurance, only to find that they get a letter shortly afterwards from the DVLA informing them of the revocation of their driving licence. Unfortunately, there is little that can be done. There is no appeal from a fixed penalty notice, once accepted.

There is a curious aspect of the  new driver regulations that if, as an alternative to awarding 6 points or more, the Court decides to disqualify the driver, then revocation does not take effect. It is sometimes possible that a Court can be persuaded to adopt that approach, although this is discouraged by the higher courts. We would advise you to take expert legal advice if this is an option you wish to explore. The advantage is that a short driving ban is likely to take you off the road for less time than a revocation, which takes effect until the driver has successfully retaken the full driving test.

Comments from a happy Keep Your Licence client:

“I had to plead guilty to no insurance and received a tally of 12 points. Richard set out my case and managed to keep my licence. I will recommend Keep Your Licence to my friends and family.”

(JAMES TOMLIN)

If you have any questions about the matters on this page, or you believe your driving licence may be in danger of revocation, then you should get expert help by calling 0800 0126039, or fill out an enquiry form.